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The end of traditional trading

Nov 02, 2009
By Greg Emerson Bocquet
Ares IX
Ares1X lifts off as space shuttle Atlantis sits on pad 39A with the first experimental test flight of the hardware NASA is developing to replace the space shuttle. Photo courtesy of Newscom

After months of anticipation, insidebitcoins.com reviews the automated trading platform “Bitcoin Revolution”, which still makes profit even through an economic recession or pandemic…., a panel of experts tasked with evaluating both the ends and the means of the U.S. space program, came back with its recommendation last week: “The committee finds that no plan compatible with the FY 2010 budget profile permits human exploration to continue in any meaningful way.”

As we highlighted in a July feature, To Land Among the Stars, unmanned probes, satellites and exploration rovers have a much better track record of scientific discovery than humans ever did. At the same time, the innovations required to support people in the vacuum of space have generated clear material benefits here on Earth.

Sending humans to the Moon, Mars or elsewhere, though, would require annual budgetary increases of $3 billion, according to the committee, which was chaired by former Lockheed Martin CEO Norm Augustine. Such a increase seems unlikely—if not impossible—in the face of the massive budget deficits expected over the coming years.

Under the current schedule, the space shuttle program will end when construction on the International Space Station (ISS) is completed in 2010. The original plan was to have the successor Ares rockets ready to take over in 2014, though the Augustine Committee’s evaluation puts this date at an optimistic 2017, and possibly as late as 2019. With the ISS set to be decommissioned in 2016, that is a problem.

Norm Augustine
Norm Augustine testifies before the House during “National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at 50.” Photo courtesy of Newscom

The committee developed five scenarios for the future of the nation’s space effort. They ranged from living within the existing budget—which would push the development of the new rockets and lunar landers “until well into the 2030s, if ever”—to massive new spending aimed at returning humans to the moon by the mid 2020s. Sandwiched in between are privatization and collaboration with Russia, India and other nations whose space programs might now leapfrog our own.

Whatever the Obama administration and Congress decide, odds are that no one is going to follow in Neil Armstrong’s lunar footsteps any time soon.




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I don’t think that astronauts going to Mars is either practical or desirable at this time. On the other hand, creating a manned colony on the Moon’s south pole in the next couple of decades is so important both scientifically and militarily that it simply must be done. To not do it, in my opinion, will be one of the most disastrous mistakes this country has ever made. SIGNATURE:ADVENTURES OF MIGHTY POWER RANGERS EPISODES

jenifferhomes jenifferhomes
Jul 14, 2010

That’s a pity. I was hoping for a Mars landing by men by 2025 so I could see it in my lifetime. Perhaps nanotechnology, as it develops, will help to build the Space Elevator and thus afford a cheap way into space. The revenue from such space tourism could help fund more ambitious programmes like Mars… Politicians always find money for war but not for space!

asif naqshbandi
Jan 24, 2010

Isn’t enough money being spent on war? Is the paradigm shift going to occur in our lives or is it to late???

Geoffrey Hubbs
Jan 24, 2010

With private corps like Xprise offering a fortune of prizes for feats such as designing a ship to break the Earths atmosphere, come back to the ground, refuel and fly again in the same week the private sector seems bound to surpass the US growth. How long will it be until we are harvesting resources from other planets? Will it be private sector or govt?

christian shope
Jan 22, 2010

I would support the exploration and eventual population of near-Earth space. However, the exploration of the rest of the solar system (including the Moon and Mars) would be better accomplished with human-assisted robots, such as we see with the drones now being used to attack terrorists in the Middle East.

Edward Larrabee
Dec 23, 2009

I’m an author now, but I was an aerospace engineer for over thirty years, eight of it in the USAF, and worked on many missions to the outer planets and Space Shuttle Missions. I don’t think that astronauts going to Mars is either practical or desirable at this time. On the other hand, creating a manned colony on the Moon’s south pole in the next couple of decades is so important both scientifically and militarily that it simply must be done. To not do it, in my opinion, will be one of the most disastrous mistakes this country has ever made. Indeed, it might the one act that will make America a second rate country for the next one hundred years. The Moon’s south pole may very well be the most important location in the Solar System. David Sheppard http://palehorseblog.com

David Sheppard
Nov 29, 2009

I understand that the economic problems make spending money on going to space really expensive, but the idea that we humans will be content to just let robots do all of our exploration in space is probably not going to happen. Can you imagine early Europeans, if they had been able to send a probe to return video footage and soil samples of the New World, to just leave it at that? No. Even if there was no life there they would have gone to see if there was anything to learn from such a place. The same is going to be true with space. Maybe robots will help to show us where we should go, but humans will definitely be going further into space. It’s just good to see that since the USA can’t afford it that other countries like India and China and Europe, seem to be able to be the next ones at the front of the space race.

Frank Deleuze
Nov 16, 2009

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